How To Tell If The Chicken Is Done – How to Cook Chicken

There are a lot of ways on how you would be able to tell if a chicken cooked. Unlike other kinds of meat and fish, you cannot eat a medium rare chicken unless you want to get salmonella. So here are a few ways on how to tell if a chicken is done.

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How To Know When Chicken Is Done Via PerdueChicken

HISTORY OF CHICKEN

  • Chicken is probably the most common poultry in the world today and that is also the same during the Middle Ages. It is the main ingredient of one of the most common stews at that time, the White Dish.
    • It consists of chicken and fried onions and it is cooked in milk and seasoned with spices and sugar mixed with it.
  • The chicken was once the most expensive meat during the 1800s in the United States. It is known as the “food for the rich” since it is such an uncommon dish.

EDIBLE COMPONENTS OF CHICKEN

EDIBLE COMPONENTS OF CHICKEN Via stravaganzastravaganza

  • Breasts – this part of the chicken is relatively dry and has white meat
  • Legs – this part of the chicken is known to have dark meat Drumstick – lower part of the leg
    • Drumstick – lower part of the leg
    • Thigh – upper part of the leg
  • Wing – it is often served as a companion for drinking
    • Buffalo Wings – is the most common chicken wings dish
  • Chicken Feet – In western countries, they most of the time throw away the feet of a chicken but in Asian countries like Thailand and Philippines they often make it into different types of dishes.
  • Giblets – these are organs of a chicken such as heart, gizzard, and liver
  • Head – In some Asian countries, they actually consider this as a delicacy, and they split the head in two while they eat the brain with it
  • Kidney – this is also a part where most western countries get rid of but are actually edible
  • Pygostyle – Also known as chicken buttocks and testicles; It may sound a little unusual to eat but it is actually a common food in South East Asia
  • Blood – The blood may actually be drained into a receptacle immediately after slaughter. In the Philippines, the blood is poured into cylindrical forms and is cut into cubes to make soup dishes or may also be grilled and dipped into vinegar
  • Skin – also in the Philippines, the skin of the chicken may sound a little too normal but in this country, they actually fry it and eat the skin as it is. No meat just the skin

WAYS OF COOKING CHICKEN

BAKING/ROASTING

Roasting/Baking Via thekitchn

You can cook the entire chicken in an oven at 400 degrees for 50-60 minutes (2-3lbs chicken). You cover it with foil but it will take longer but if you want it to be crispier, after an hour you can uncover the chicken and let it cook for another 20-30 minutes

FRYING

Frying Chicken Via reference

This possibly the most common way to cook chicken. You can fry any part of the chicken you wish to eat by entirely coating it with flour then toss into the pan with boiling oil and let it cook for about 10 minutes until it is golden brown

GRILLING/BBQ

GRILLED BBQ CHICKEN Via simplesweetsavory

What is so good about this method is the flavor. Before grilling it, you would have to marinade the chicken the all the herbs and spices that you want for overnight in the fridge and the next day you toss it to the grill and there you have it

HOW TO CHECK IF A CHICKEN IS DONE?

With a Thermometer

Check If A Chicken Is Done With A Thermometer Via fsis

This is probably the best way to check if the chicken is already cooked. It is also very simple and it's something that you surely will use all the time if you love meat.

There are two types of meat thermometers:

  • Single-piece design which has a gauge at the end of it
  • Digital design works better with checking the meat since the long cord between the probe and the display makes it easier to reach into an oven to check without actually getting the pan of your chicken out of the oven
    • Insert the probe into a certain part of the chicken it is best if you insert it to the thickest part of the meat which is usually the breast part
    • Wait for the temperature to rise and the perfect temperature for a cooked chicken is usually 160 to 165F
    • DON’T stick the probe near a bone of the chicken because it heats up faster and you might get the wrong results

How to Properly Take the Internal Temperature with a Meat Thermometer Via meatnewsnetwork

Without a Thermometer

Feel the meat – You simply have to check if the meat is still raw. What you have to do is to pinch the flesh on your hand below your thumb leaving your hand as relaxed as possible.

  • And to know if your chicken is already cooked, you simply touch your pinkie and thumb together

The Finger Test to Check the Doneness of Meat Via simplyrecipes

  • This method takes practice but you will definitely get a hang of it

Poke the meat – you simply have to poke the meat and when the juice coming out of it is clear then it is done but if it is kind of pinkish, your chicken might need to be cooked a little bit longer

Brining the chicken – this method adds juiciness to your chicken meat so it must be cooked for a longer time. With this, you can ensure that your chicken will be cooked once it is done​

Beer Brined Chicken Via talesfrommyplate

  • You simply have to put your chicken into a bowl of cold water
  • Then add a few drops of Worcestershire sauce
  • Add about ¼ cup of salt if it has 4 cups of water
  • And let it brine for about 30-50 minutes

RISKS OF UNDERCOOKED CHICKEN

  • Salmonella Poisoning
  • Campylobacteriosis
  • Clostridium Pefringens
  • Staphylococcal Intoxication

The symptoms of these are all the same: Nausea, Diarrhea, Severe Abdominal Pain, and Vomiting.

Lita Watson
 

Hi there! I’m Lita, and I’m absolutely in love with cooking blogs. I’m a beginner in cooking and i try my best to make it quick and easy. Even though, it’s not always quick and easy to keep up with fancy dinners… so i keep learning and blogging about quick and easy ways to create delicious and yummy foods for my two kids and a wonderful husband.

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